Fly Control

The life cycles of flies are complex, but each species has the same developmental stages in common, consisting of an egg, larval (maggot) stage, pua and finally the adult. Growth at each immature stage is dependent on many variables but primarily tempera

Long Tongue Tachinid Fly

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The life cycles of flies are complex, but each species has the same developmental stages in common, consisting of an egg, larval (maggot) stage, pua and finally the adult.  Growth at each immature stage is dependent on many variables but primarily temperature and suitable substrates for a food supply.  Each adult fly has its own special requirements that must be met before mating and egg laying commences. 

Non-biting flies are often associated with domestic dwellings, especially throughout the warmer months when flies breed prolifically, invading home and can be a constant annoyance for humans.  Flies are equipped with special sensory cells on their antennae and feet which enable them to locate suitable food and egg laying sites.  These sensory cells aid in detecting compounds such as ammonia, carbon dioxide and other strong compounds that are emitted from decomposing organic materials, such as carrion and faeces.  The free interchange flies have with such sites ensures the flies are laden with bacteria on their mouthparts, body hairs and the sticky pads of their feet, as well as in their stomachs (where the bacteria rapidly multiply), faces and vomitus.  Contact with any foodstuffs, or feeding, which often involves vomiting and defecating, will contaminate food, preparation surfaces and utensils with potentially disease causing organisms. 

Properly fitting screen doors and window are essential to exclude flies from homes and other areas where food is prepared.  UV insect lights and air curtains used in industrial applications are effective but maybe cost prohibitive in a domestic situation.  A combination of good sanitation and mechanical exclusion will produce the same effect and keep fly populations under control.  Elimination of potential breeding sites will help in the general reduction of fly numbers.  Pet faeces should be removed and fresh manure and other compost dug into garden beds.  Routine emptying and cleaning of all garbage receptacles will reduce breeding.  People travelling to destinations that may include rural areas of Africa and Central and South America should be aware of possible infection by the immature stages of several exotic flies.